The Wild Atlantic Way – Your Way

The Wild Atlantic Way on Ireland’s west coast leads you through one of the world’s most dramatic coastal landscapes, a landscape on the edge of Europe that has shaped the development of its people, communities and settlements, a landscape that has inspired its own particular language, literature, art, song and dance. It’s a place of many natural features - seascapes, sea-life, cliffs, mountains, glens, loughs, trails and pathways. It’s a place to experience nature at its wildest, a place to explore the history of the Gaels and their religion; a place to experience great events, great food and drink, great music and the craic. Experience Irish Culture at its best and take time to share a story or two with the locals while you are here!

Donegal The County of the Gaels

Discover spectacular views at every turn of the road in majestic Donegal and hit refresh with a visit to one of the most scenic parts of Ireland al while you fill your heart with our beautiful county.

The vast Derryveagh Mountains rule the raw landscape, explore its walking trails and loops. Find some of the world’s best beaches here and make time for the white sand of Ballymastocker Bay.

Experience the charms of this stunning county, & plan to explore Donegal now.

Mulroy Woods is your window to the Wild Atlantic Way as you unleash your spirit of outdoor adventure in some of the most breathtaking Wild Atlantic Way signature points – all within minutes of the hotel.

Many of Donegal’s most iconic destinations and beauty spots - where lifelong memories are made - are within a short distance of the hotel.

Embrace your Wild Atlantic Way experiences in the comforting knowledge that the perfect Donegal après-adventure hospitality awaits with open fire warmth, nourishing, homemade dishes and genuine Donegal craic.

Donegal’s Wild Atlantic Way – Your Way at Mulroy Woods.

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WAW Signature Point 

Fanad Head

Fanad Head is the second of Donegal’s Discovery Points on the Wild Atlantic Way. Here man’s presence and his ability to exist in even the wildest of locations is seen in the form of Fanad Head Lighthouse. Now automated, the 39 meter lighthouse, first shone its light on St. Patrick’s Day 1817 and has been the subject of many stunning photograph’s and paintings over the years. Stop a while and imagine what life was like in hurricane force winds on cold November nights nearly two centuries ago. As you gaze on the unforgiving waters of the Northern Atlantic you can capture a view of Tory Island 14.5km (9 Miles) out to sea.